There's Robbers in My Thoughts

Listen to me, your body is not a temple. Temples can be destroyed and desecrated. Your body is a forest—thick canopies of maple trees and sweet scented wildflowers sprouting in the under wood. You will grow back, over and over, no matter how badly you are devastated.

— Beau Taplin (via quotethat)


lioneater:

Truisms and Inflammatory Essays by Jenny Holzer. American

This is a sampling of Holzer’s early work, where she printed out the above and plastered them all over NYC in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s. Unlike her current work, these were never intended to be museum pieces, but displayed in the public sphere. Also they were not produced to become permanent pieces of art. 

(Source: zeusammon)


Hence, anti-consumerist politics is a lifestyle politics that assumes the problem with capitalism lurks at the point of consumption rather than the point of production; it assumes that the solution to capitalism is based on our buying choices, on de-commodifying by refusing to buy from big corporations, and living as pure anti-capitalists in an individual sense. The fact that the vast majority of people, especially those with the power to change society, cannot opt out in this kind of way, or the fact that buying at ‘ethical’ sites of production does not at all escape commodification, eludes this simplistic and self-righteous politics. Nor do most of the people who push this anti-consumerism see any contradiction in wearing clothes, walking down sidewalks, or living at the centres of capitalism which is entirely dependent on the brutal system they claim they are fighting when they make fun of people buying Banksy prints at Walmart.

— “Argh! Lifestyle Consumerist Politics!" (M-L-M Mayhem!)

(Source: lysenkoist)


Float
through me like you mean it, that’s what
this is about. Eat this cake like you’re
starving, that’s what I want. Wash over me
like a hurricane. I need something
more than clean.

— Alexis Pope, closing lines to “A No Good Thunderstorm,” from Fourteen Hills (vol. 20, no. 1, 2013)

(Source: memoryslandscape)